Bill 37 poses serious threat to Medicare

EDMONTON - The provincial government's controversial Bill 37 poses a serious threat to the future of Medicare and should be scrapped, says the Alberta Federation of Labour.

That was the central message of the AFL's submission to the government's so-called "Blue-Ribbon" panel on Bill 37.

The panel was established late last fall in response to widespread public opposition to Bill 37. As part of the review process, the panel has agreed to consider submissions from a small number of interested organizations, including the AFL.

"By allowing for the possibility of private hospitals, Bill 37 is breaching a trust with Albertans," says the AFL brief, which was delivered to the panel Friday afternoon. "It is fundamentally altering how our public health care system operates. We realize these are strong words, but the magnitude of the shift should not be underestimated."

The AFL says Bill 37 is dangerous because it would pave the way for the establishment of "approved treatment facilities" - which would really be private, for-profit hospitals all but in name. The AFL's submission was also highly critical of sections of the Bill that give the Minister of Health sole authority to approve private, for-profit facilities.

"There is no process to direct the Minister or any limitations on the Minister's discretion," says the AFL brief. "The Act lays out no objective criteria for determining if a private health facility is endangering Medicare."

The most serious problem with the Bill, argues the AFL, is that it abandons one of the central principles that Medicare was built upon - namely that universal access to quality health care can only be guaranteed by maintaining public funding and public administration.

"For the first time, we have a piece of legislation that enshrines and formalizes a role for private health care delivery," says the AFL brief. "The new role for private health care is not just at the margins and with unregulated portions of the health system. Bill 37 places private health care at the centre of our health care system - acute care."

The AFL brief concludes by calling on the government to scrap Bill 37 altogether. What's needed instead, the AFL argues, is a complete ban on private, for-profit hospitals and an enhanced financial commitment to the public health care system.

"There is absolutely no doubt that Alberta's health care system is ailing," says AFL president Audrey Cormack. "But more private, for-profit health care is not the answer. Bill 37 - and any other Bill like it - would weaken our health care system further. That's why it must be scrapped."

Copies of the AFL brief on Bill 37 can be obtained by calling the AFL office at (780)483-3021.

For more information call:

Audrey Cormack, President: 483-3021 (work)     499-6530 (cell)    429-9367 (home)

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Labour Unions To Hold Rally In Support of Striking Drywall Workers

Tuesday, January 19 @ 4:30 pm
Georgia Pacific Plant
403 - 118A Avenue (see map below)

The Alberta Federation of Labour (AFL) is organizing a support rally for striking workers at the Georgia-Pacific drywall plant in Northeast Edmonton. The workers, members of the Boilermakers Union, Local D-513, were locked out by Georgia-Pacific three days before Christmas.

"Georgia-Pacific is the largest building products manufacturer in North America. It wants to import its U.S.-style bargaining tactics to Alberta. I think working people in Alberta need to remind them that Canada does things differently," says Audrey Cormack, AFL President.

Georgia Pacific is demanding shift changes that may result in job losses for up to one-third of the plant employees. It also wants rollbacks in the workers' benefit package.

The rally is intended to boost the morale of the striking workers on the eve of a new bargaining session.

For further information contact:

Audrey Cormack, President
483-3021(wk)/428-9367(hm)/499-6530 (cell)

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EI system has failed Alberta workers

EDMONTON - The federal government's new Employment Insurance system has failed to provide working people in Alberta with kind of protection they need and deserve, says Audrey Cormack, president of the Alberta Federation of Labour.

That's the message that Cormack will deliver to a travelling parliamentary panel when it stops in Edmonton tomorrow.

The panel is chaired by Yvon Godin, a Nova Scotia MP and EI critic for the federal New Democrat caucus. Godin has been travelling the country since before Christmas in order to gather information about the impact of changes made to the EI system in 1996.

"Mr. Godin says he wants to get a clear picture of what effect the changes have had on the lives of ordinary Canadians," says Cormack. "Well, here in Alberta the situation is clear - only a tiny fraction of the unemployed currently qualify benefits under the new rules. The EI system is no longer there for Canadians when they need it."

The EI panel will be meeting between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. tomorrow (Tuesday, January 12) in Ballroom B of the Howard Johnson Hotel - located at 10010-104 Street in downtown Edmonton.

Cormack is scheduled to give her presentation to the panel at 10 a.m. Godin will be available to answer questions during breaks throughout the day. At 3 p.m., Godin will summarize what he has heard during the day.

For more information call:
Gil McGowan, Communications Director: 483-3021

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Missing out on the Boom: A report card

Missing out on the Boom? (A Report Card on Jobs, Wagds and Economic Security in Alberta)

In the next twenty pages, we will provide an update of the economic "snapshot" presented in Crumbs From the Table. We will re-examine issues like individual and family income, public services and job quality. Most importantly, we will attempt to determine whether or not ordinary Albertans are benefiting any more from their province's ongoing prosperity-
in the form of increased wages, better services or improved job security-than they did last year.

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Crumbs from the Table: Re-evaluating the so-called "Alberta Advantage"

Crumbs from the Table: Re-evaluating the so-called "Alberta Advantage"

A report card on jobs, wages and economic security in Alberta (March 1997)

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